‘For Facebook, they’re clients with privacy rights’: How Big Tech is letting predators get away with grooming online | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED X-Frame-Options: DENY X-Frame-Options: SAMEORIGIN

‘For Facebook, they’re clients with privacy rights’: How Big Tech is letting predators get away with grooming online

‘Sex trafficking’ conjures a vision of victims bundled by gangs into the back of trucks and driven across borders. But they’re being bought and sold much closer to home too: on the internet. Survivors share their stories with RT.

Recent investigations have shown that Big Tech companies has been aware of online sex trafficking for years. According to the 2020 Federal Human Trafficking Report, 59% of online victim recruitment in active sex-trafficking cases in the US last year occurred on Facebook. “Despite Facebook’s reputation as a less popular platform among teenagers, it was a more common platform for recruiting child victims than adult victims in 2020,” the report revealed.

RT spoke with three US-based women about the seedy world of online sex trafficking, with its secret code words, manipulation, and victims sold to the highest bidder. Misty – who wishes to keep her full name secret – was joined by fellow survivor and now activist Chong Kim, and advocate and writer Gia Santos, who offers support to victims. All spoke of how deep-rooted the issue is, despite occurring in plain sight, and how little is being done to eradicate it.

Kim says she was sex-trafficked in the mid-1990s, by a guy she met online who was pictured wearing a uniform and whom she came to think of as her boyfriend: “He pretended to be in the US military, but never was. He told me he wanted to take me to Florida to meet his family. I ended up in Northern Nevada on a Native American reservation, where me and 20 to 30 girls were locked up in a storage unit.”

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