WhatsApp's changes to personal data violate users' privacy and pose a threat to national security, according to a court filing in India, the app's biggest market | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED X-Frame-Options: SAMEORIGIN

WhatsApp's changes to personal data violate users' privacy and pose a threat to national security, according to a court filing in India, the app's biggest market

After widespread backlash from users and privacy activists alike, a petition has been filed in India against WhatsApp's new privacy policy.

The petition, filed in the Delhi High Court, calls on the Indian government to ensure WhatsApp does not share user data with third parties, Bar & Bench report.

WhatsApp informed users on Wednesday that it was updating its terms of service and privacy policies from February 8, 2021.

The messaging platform announced it would start sharing some personal data, including phone numbers and locations, with its parent company, Facebook.

If users don't agree to new terms of service, they will lose access to the app.

A WhatsApp spokesperson told Ars Technica the change was to allow businesses to store WhatsApp chats using Facebook's broader infrastructure. The company says the changes do not impact users in the UK or the EU, and do not affect the privacy of conversations with friends and family.

India's government is examining the new policy
The Indian government has begun examining the controversy surrounding WhatsApp's new update, according to the Times of India.

"We are collecting details," said an official source.

India's is WhatsApp's biggest market.

The issue is reportedly being discussed at the highest levels of the IT ministry.

One of the reasons behind this could be the different approach WhatsApp has taken with respect to privacy in the European Union and countries like India.

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